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Home Defense Shotgun Build – DIY

Magazine Capacity – Is it Important?


In light of recent events the discussion of magazine capacity has been coming up alot lately. I have alot of old school friends who believe that 5 shots from a revolver is more than enough for any self defense situation and I think in many cases they’re right.

But what about those few times when more rounds may be the difference between life and death? What about those times when your aim just isn’t what it should be because as much as u train, when its a real situation, you might need more capacity to get rounds on target?

Capacity is something that over the last few years I’ve become more and more of a proponent of just based on my own ideology changing because of my turn towards prepping. Now I won’t get into any prepping tips in this article but one thing that has been impressed upon me because of prepping is that its always better to be overprepared than underprepared and I feel this should be just as relevant for self defense as it is for prepping.

I won’t start spouting off statistics (but I do encourage everyone to do their own research) but after doing my own studying on this topic I’ve found that the difference between stopping a threat and not stopping a threat was more dependent on rounds on target than it was caliber (not that it was the only factor, just a more determining factor). This told me that capacity is definitely an issue that should be addressed and considered when choosing a firearm for any defensive situation.

My recommendations are to carry the largest capacity firearm in a suitable self defense caliber (9mm and up in a semi-auto & .38spl & up in a revolver) in the size your able and willing to carry. So for instance if your willing to carry a full sized firearm then by all means carry a good doublestack .45acp pistol, that should give you at least 14+1 capacity which is a very effective package. If however your going to be carrying something like a compact or sub-compact firearm then your doing yourself a favor by going with a smaller caliber like 9mm that can give u greater capacity than a .45acp, especially in a sub compact where the difference can be 12+1 for a 9mm and 6+1 for a .45acp.

Again I always recommend doing your own research before making self defense decisions but keep these things in mind. I too was a all American .45acp loving Texas boy, born and raised, but after a little studying it became clear that while .45acp will always be #1 in my heart, it might not be right for every situation.

Choosing a Home Defense Shotgun


Alot of people are looking towards the shotgun as their “go to” home defense firearm and for good reason. A shotgun has alot going for it in a home defense situation ….. it’s simple to use, uses a highly effective round which is very versatile and just the look and sound of a shotgun is a very menacing thing, sometimes that alone can end an situation.

So it’s easy to see why alot of people choose to go this route. But what are some of the things you should look for in a home defense shotgun? Well the answer to that question varies depending on your personal situation …… things like the size and design of your home along with how close you are to other homes and how much property your home sits on are all things you’ll want to take into consideration since those things can have an affect on things like barrel length and what load your using.

All that being said there are some basics that I’ve found useful and a good place to start when choosing a good defensive shotgun.


First is barrel length. A good all around length for a defensive shotgun is about 20 inches or less. Now if your defensive situation involves you home sitting on a larger area of land that you’ll want to defend then you might go for a longer barrel but most people just looking for a defensive shotgun for in home use will find the shorter barrel just makes more sense.

Next you’ll want to make sure you comfortable with your stock setup. I’ve found that having a pistol grip makes more “tactical” style shooting easier. Now this doesn’t mean you should do away with your shoulder stock, in fact having a setup that uses a pistol grip and shoulder stock usually gives you the most control over the gun.

You’ll also want to make sure you have a reloading system in place somewhere on the weapon. Now what I mean by this is that you’ll want extra ammo somewhere on the gun. Some options for this are stock mounted shell carriers, side saddles shell carries that sit on the left hand side of the receiver and slings or bandoliers that hold several rounds of spare ammo.

Another things you’ll want to look into is getting a good mount and flashlight on your shotgun since just as with any defensive weapon you never know what time of day or night it will be when you need to use your weapon.


You’ll notice that two things that you might otherwise think I’d mention were left out ……. those being choice of Gauge and what particular Brand to look at. The reason those were left out is because I feel they are less of a necessary factor and more of a personal choice.

The question of gauge really comes down to preference and choosing shotgun loads that compliment your weapon in a defensive situation …. an example would be that if your shotgun is a .410 gauge then I’d definitely recommend using proper defensive ammo as opposed to bird shot, whereas in 12 gauge many times birdshot might be enough to take care of the situation.

As far as brand goes …… a shotgun is a shotgun and its petty hard to screw it up, especially if its not a semi-auto. So go for the model and brand you prefer.

So those are the basics as I see them. Choosing a shotgun doesn’t have to be too complicated and usually doesn’t have to require too much of an investment, just remember to choose wisely.

The Go Bag Concept

First off, what is a Go Bag? The basic concept of a Go Bag is simply a bag or pack of some sort loaded with the necessary gear to get you out of a bad situation quickly.

Most of us would probably use this tool in a home defense situation where we would want to be able to grab something quickly to have all the needed gear to defend our home and our family, wether by defending an area of our home or by fleeing the situation as safely as possible.

Now lets talk about what a Go Bag isn’t. It isn’t a Bug Out Bag. This isn’t something you’ll want to load with a bunch of useless equipment geared at helping you bug out. You simply want the essentials needed to get you out of a bad situation quickly.

Sounds pretty simple, but there are a few things you’ll want to take into consideration when choosing a bag or pack to fill this roll and what gear to put in it.

First off is the bag itself. There are several options that we’ll go over that will give u an idea of what will work best for you. The most common option are …….

Backpack

At first glance this seems to be a great choice for a go bag as it can be easily carried on the move and usually has plenty of room for gear, but it is not in fact a good choice. The key reason is because it is a BACKpack and therefore can not be easily accessed with out removing it from your body.

 

 

 

Tactical Vest (LBV or MOLLE)

A great option as it can carry everything you need and nothing you don’t and can be customized to suit your specific needs as far as gear placement. The only down side is getting it on in a bad situation, it could be a bit cumbersome to get on and keep a hand free for a weapon or other defensive tool, but overall still a great option.

 

 

Fanny Pack (or other wait mounted gear pack)

This is perhaps one of the best options as it is just big enough to carry whatever you might need and small enough to stay out of your way. The only downside is having to wear what is basically a Fanny Pack even if it does say Maxpedition.

 

 

Sachel

This is what I personally use. It works well because its easy to get off and on with one hand while keeping the other free for whatever you might need and its more than big enough to carry whatever gear you need. The only downside is that most satchels are usually fairly big in that most are designed to handle paperwork and things like laptops, so you will have excess space.

 

 

Now lets get on to what gear you should think about putting in your Go Bag.

The basics should be ……

Pistol

Holster for your pistol

Extra magazines or ammo

Flashlight

Small First Aid kit

Spare keys to all vehicles and locations

Cell Phone

So thats it, not really too much need for anything else, although everyone will have their own opinions on what may work best for them.

Just remember to keep it simple to avoid confusion in a bad situation.